Tyler Melton C.J.E. of  Jostens Yearbooks

821 Lee Road 980Smiths Station, AL 36877

Phone: 706-587-9154

Click here to e-mail Tyler.

Click here and tell us how we are doing.

A little bit about Tyler Melton

Tyler Melton's journey to the world of yearbooks began in college where he was a graduate from the Troy University Hall School of Journalism. He spent 10 years at TSYS, Inc., a market leader in payment technologies providing electronic payment services to financial institutions around the globe. There Tyler managed corporate education projects for national and international accounts.

Now he enjoys utilizing his journalism and business backgrounds to help schools tell their story in the yearbook. He loves the fact that the yearbook is an outlet for student creativity where they can learn key technical and life skills in journalism, design and business. In 2013 Tyler earned the Certified Journalism Education recognition from the Journalism Education Association. Away from the yearbook pages you will most often find Tyler with his family or church where he is the student minister. His wife Valerie is a life-long educator and they have two daughters, Emma and Ella.

Tyler's plant consultant in Clarksville is Yvonne Lewis.

You can reach Yvonne by phone at 800-248-9725 extension 45173.

Click here to e-mail Yvonne.

CJE

Three little letters and what they mean

You may have noticed that I now have three additional letters (CJE) after my name on this newsletter. I thought this might be a good place to tell everyone about those three little letters—how I earned them and why I am proud they follow my name.

CJE stands for Certified Journalism Educator. That means that I, as well as other Jostens reps from around the country, have taken part in the Journalism Education Association’s (JEA) rigorous accreditation process as part of Jostens formal sales representative training program. Earning the certification requires weeks of preparation and passing a three-hour exam focusing on journalistic writing and editing, graphics and design, legal and ethical considerations, fiscal management, leadership training, conflict resolution and more.

Here’s what it means to the JEA from its executive director, Kelly Furnas: “Certification from the Journalism Education Association helps signify the top performers in our profession—those individuals who are not only great educators but great journalists, too. I think it speaks volumes about a yearbook company that would make this level of excellence a standard for its representatives who interact with classrooms.”

If you are not familiar with the JEA, they are the largest scholastic journalism organization, with 2,500 members consisting of journalism teachers and publication advisers, media professionals, press associations, adviser organizations, libraries, publishing companies, newspapers, radio stations and departments of journalism. I am proud to be a part of this organization and to have been one of the first yearbook reps certified by them as a Journalism Educator.